Monthly Archives: December 2014

Review: Glass by Ellen Hopkins (Crank series)

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GlassGlass by Ellen Hopkins (Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2007), Crank series

Have You Ever Tried

To quit

            a bad habit, one

            that has come to

            define you?

 

Kristina has been clean and sober for months now. She’s living at home and taking care of baby Hunter. She’s studying for her GED and looking for a job. She’ll be eighteen in just a few weeks. Things are looking good, right up until she starts thinking about how boring her life is, and how much weight she gained during her pregnancy, and how nice it would be to have a boyfriend again, and she thinks maybe, just maybe, if she stays in control, she can start using again.

This is the first in a long series of bad decisions that Kristina makes. At first things seem to be going just fine: she’s losing weight, she’s got a job, and it’s easy to score high-quality crank that is perfect for a pick-me-up to get her through the day. But of course, things aren’t just fine, and the last straw for Kristina’s parents comes when she crashes hard and doesn’t wake up even for her screaming baby. Kristina is thrown out of the house and her parents tell her she won’t see Hunter again until she cleans herself up.

That’s when things spiral out of control. Kristina moves in with her boyfriend’s cousin, who is also their drug dealer. She’s living from paycheck to paycheck, spending all of her money on drugs. She’s engaging in risky behaviors—driving while she’s high, having unprotected sex, stealing money—and on the rare occasions when she does talk with her family, she keeps pushing them away—and, she realizes after she hangs up the phone, she keeps forgetting to ask about Hunter. She’s shut herself off from her former friends, her family, even her own child.

While Crank focused on how seductive drugs can be and how anyone can start using and become addicted, Glass is about the impact of addiction on users and the people around them. Kristina’s life revolves around drugs: when and where she’ll score, how she’ll pay, when and how much she’ll use. Her relationships all revolve around drugs: the people she buys from, the people she sleeps with while she’s high. The book is written in free verse and is told entirely from Kristina’s point of view, so it’s left to the reader to imagine what her family must be going through (Kristina, of course, is too lost in her addiction to be able to see anything outside of herself). This is not an easy book to read. It’s utterly heart-wrenching. But it’s an amazing depiction of the destruction wrought by addiction, and the way in which the story is told—Kristina’s words break your heart because you can see what’s happening and know what’s coming, and you know she’s going to keep making bad decisions as long as she continues to use—is unique and compelling.

 

My rating: 4 of 5 stars