Review: Crank by Ellen Hopkins

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CrankCrank by Ellen Hopkins (Margaret K. McElderry Books, 2004)

 

Life was good
before I
met
the monster.
After,
life
was great,
At
least
for a little while.

 

Crank is the story of an ordinary girl who becomes a meth addict. It’s told in free verse form, so there’s not much in the way of narrative or dialogue, but that makes the story all the more powerful because it’s stripped down to its bones.

Kristina is an ordinary teenager. She’s sixteen and it’s the summer before her junior year in high school. She’s a straight-A student with an older sister and a younger brother, a mother and a stepfather. The book begins when she goes to stay with her biological father, who is an addict, for three weeks. While in Albuquerque she discovers Bree: the side of herself that is reckless, a vamp, who likes attention and who is willing to break all the rules that Kristina lives by. As Bree, she attracts the attention of the boy who introduces her to love—and to crank, the monster that changes her life forever.

I can understand why parents wouldn’t want their children to read Crank. But this is the kind of book I would have loved as a teenager precisely because Kristina was someone I could relate to; she could have been any one of my friends. The underlying message—that drug addiction can happen to anyone, and escaping the monster is almost impossible—is a powerful and important one, and the unique structure and the power of the storytelling resulted in a book I read in one sitting.

Hopkins wrote this based on her own experiences with her daughter, who was addicted to methamphetamines, and that gives the book a very real feel. It’s honest and it’s harsh and it pulls no punches about the consequences of drug abuse. Kristina/Bree’s inner conflict is heart-wrenching: she wants to be a good girl, a good student, a good sister and daughter and friend, but the pull of the monster is stronger. She makes one bad choice after another—almost all of them based on her need for crank—and the consequences are life-altering in a way she never could have imagined before she started using.

 

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

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One response »

  1. Pingback: Review: Glass by Ellen Hopkins (Crank series) | Red Panda Reads

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