Monthly Archives: July 2014

Review: The Runner by Patrick Lee

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The RunnerThe Runner by Patrick Lee (2014, Minotaur)

Sam Dryden, ex-special forces, goes out for a run one night and encounters a young girl who’s being chased by heavily armed men intent on killing her. Drysden, who lost his wife and daughter in an accident several years before, saves Rachel—and she, in turn, saves him, as for the first time in a very long time Dryden’s life has purpose: finding out who this girl is (she has no idea), who’s been holding her captive and why (again, she doesn’t know), and perhaps most interesting, how it is that she seemingly can read his mind.

This book is all about pacing. It’s roller-coaster action from start to finish, and what a ride it is: paramilitary super-soldiers, sophisticated weaponry, high-level conspiracies, and a hint of paranormal super-powers. But in the midst of all of the action, Lee creates complex, memorable characters. Dryden isn’t a cardboard cutout action hero. Sure, he can take on the best the military sends after him, but he can also show genuine affection and concern for a frightened preteen.

The storytelling is uneven in places. Because the book is so action oriented, sometimes there’s not enough attention given to motives. People did things and I wasn’t entirely sure why. While no words were wasted, I felt a bit could be added to flesh things out a bit. But this is a nitpick, because this book was a lot of fun to read.

I’ve read the first book in another series by this author: The Breach, which has an even bigger science fiction element. After reading The Runner, I’ve added the next books in both series to my TBR pile.

 

This book was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

 

Review: Merrick by Ken Bruen

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MerrickMerrick by Ken Bruen (2014, Premier Digital Publishing)

Ryan was a cop in Galway before being fired for being on the take. When he lost his job, his wife left him for another man, taking their daughter with them. Having no reason to stay in Ireland and a head full of memories urging him to go, Ryan headed for New York City, where he works building skyscrapers, fearlessly walking the girders as they build the highest floors.

Once in New York he meets Merrick, another former cop turned private investigator and bar owner. Merrick quickly recognizes the cop in Ryan, and the two become friends. Soon Merrick begins to confide in Ryan. His former partner, it turns out, is in a coma: they’d been working on a case involving a man who did unspeakable things to young boys before killing them. Merrick thinks he’s got some leads, if Ryan would be interested in helping out?

The relationship between Ryan and Merrick is a rocky one—both have explosive tempers and a chip on their shoulder, but generally speaking it’s nothing that can’t be overcome by an apology and a bottle of Jameson. The development of the friendship between the men is the heart of the novel, and it’s solid, enough so to allow for future books and a series.

As with Bruen’s other books, this one is full of pop-culture references, mostly movies and music but some books, that Ryan uses to define himself. When I finish one of Bruen’s books, I almost always have a list of names to look for, and this is no different (I’ll be checking out a couple of new bands this evening).

Merrick is a thriller in stream-of-consciousness, almost free-form verse. It’s a quick read, and a good one.

 

This copy was furnished by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

My rating: 4 of 5 stars