Review: Game by Anders de la Motte

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GameGame by Anders de la Motte (Atria/Emily Bestler Books, 2013)

Henrik Pettersson is a slacker. He doesn’t have a job, he doesn’t have friends, he spends most of his time gaming and smoking weed. He lives on unemployment benefits and the occasional petty theft. Then one day, riding the subway, he finds a cell phone. He’s planning to sell it for some cash, but then the intriguing message appears on the screen: “Wanna play a game?” At first he ignores the message, but when it instead says, “Wanna play a game, Henrik Pettersson?” he can’t resist. He presses “yes” and becomes a player in the Game.

The Game involves a series of challenges that are filmed, both by the player (using the cell phone that is the primary means of communication between the player and the Game Master) and by others, and uploaded for fans to see, rate, and comment on. Some of the challenges are simple pranks, but the longer Henrik—or HP, as he calls himself in the Game—plays, the more complex the challenges become. Not to mention risky and illegal. And possibly deadly. When the Game puts the one person HP cares about in danger, that’s when he vows to find out who’s behind it, and he begins his search for the Game Master.

Let me just start by saying the entire premise is unrealistic—a secret game involving participants at all levels of society who all cover for each other?—but as a reader, I didn’t care. I was hooked immediately, and the skillful pacing kept me hooked right up until the end. The two primary characters—Henrik and Rebecca Normén, a young cop with a bright future—are sympathetic and interesting, and their relationship to each other is both complex and believable, and laid the groundwork for their actions throughout the novel. This was a fun, quick, enjoyable read.

Game is the first book in a trilogy; the other books are Buzz and Bubble, both of which I’m eager to read.

This book was furnished by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

My rating: 4 stars

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One response »

  1. Pingback: Review: Buzz by Anders de la Motte | Red Panda Reads

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