Review: The Lewis Man by Peter May

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42985_LewisMan_HB:564x240The Lewis Man by Peter May (Quercus, 2012), Lewis Trilogy #2

 

Blurb: The male Caucasian corpse – marked by several horrific stab wounds – is initially believed by its finders to be over two thousand years old. Until they spot the Elvis tattoo on his right arm. The body, it transpires, is not evidence of an ancient ritual killing, but of a murder committed during the latter half of the twentieth century. Meanwhile, Fin Macleod has returned to the island of his birth. Having left his wife, his life in Edinburgh, and his career in the police force, the former detective inspector is intent on repairing past relationships and restoring his parents’ derelict croft. But when DNA tests flag a familial match between the bog body and the father of Fin’s childhood sweetheart, Marsaili Macdonald, Fin finds his homecoming more turbulent than expected. Tormod Macdonald, now an elderly man in the grip of dementia, had always claimed to be an only child without close family.

 

I’ve always wanted to visit the Outer Hebrides. I’m not sure why–the windswept isolation sounds beautiful to me, in a rugged hardscrabble way, and I’d like to see it for myself. Lewis makes a wonderful backdrop for these novels.

As with The Black House, Peter May has written a taut, compelling novel with wonderful characters. Fin Macleod has returned to Lewis, perhaps permanently, and is discovering that the “simple” life he left behind was anything but—in fact it’s a tangled web of conversations that never took place—and trying to find his way in the new life he’s establishing for himself. Now that Fin is finally coming to terms with the death of his son, he tries to establish a relationship with Marsaili, his teenage love, and her son, who is starting his own family. However, Fin is soon drawn into a mystery when a body is found in a bog—and judging from the Elvis tattoo and the stab wounds, the man was murdered. DNA soon links the body to Marsaili’s father, who has dementia.

The story of Tormod Macdonald is handled beautifully, with sensitivity and pathos. The key to solving the mystery of the bog body is locked up in his memories, which he can relive but cannot articulate. His story, revealed a piece at a time, is heartbreaking, all the more so because it’s based on the true stories of children like him.

It’s interesting to me that the titles for both The Black House and The Lewis Man come from the cases under investigation, because the cases are not really the focus of either book. The trilogy’s focus on character relationships and interactions, and broader social issues, is what makes it so compelling.

 

My rating: 5 stars

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3 responses »

  1. He does do the Tormod story beautifully, doesn’t he? As a long-standing fan of his work, I think this is the best book he’s ever written. I’m so glad you enjoyed it too.

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